16 Studies on Spiking and Drugging

Here’s that more comprehensive list of 16 studies:

Although research has slowed down in this area since 2010, it’s because there is a consensus among scientists: the prevalence of drink spiking and involuntary drugging is, at least among those seeking medical attention, relatively rare. The articles emphasize the role of alcohol and voluntary use of drugs in producing symptoms.

1)  Laura Jane Anderson, Asher Flynn, Jennifer Lucinda Pilgrim, “A global epidemiological perspective on the toxicology of drug-facilitated sexual assault: A systematic review,” Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine 47: 46–54,  April 2017. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jflm.2017.02.005

2) Bernadette Butler and Jan Welch, “Commentary: Drug-facilitated sexual assault,” CMAJ 180:5, March 3, 2009, 493-494. doi: 10.1503/cmaj.090006. (comment and review)

3) Michael Hurley, Helen Parker, David L. Wells, “The epidemiology of drug facilitated sexual assault,” Journal of Clinical Forensic Medicine 13, 2006, 181–185. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcfm.2006.02.005. (original research)

4) J.A. Hall and C.B.T. Moore, “Drug facilitated sexual assault – A review,”Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine 15, 2008, 291–297. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jflm.2007.12.005 . (review and comment)

5) Janice Du Mont, Sheila Macdonald et al., “Drug-facilitated sexual assault in Ontario, Canada: Toxicological and DNA findings,” Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine 17: 6, 333 – 338. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jflm.2010.05.004. (original research)

6) Michael Scott-Ham and Fiona Burton, “Toxicological findings in alleged cases of drug facilitated sexual assault in the United Kingdom over a 3-year period,” Journal of Clinical Forensic Medicine 12, 2005; 175–6. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcfm.2005.03.009 (original research)

7) M.A. ElSohly and S.J. Salamone, “Prevalence of Drugs Used in Cases of Alleged Sexual Assault,” Journal of Analytical Toxicology 23:3, May-June 1999: 141-146.doi:10.1093/jat/23.3.141. (original research)

8) Cecilie T. Hagemann, Arne Helland, et al, Ethanol and drug findings in women consulting a Sexual Assault Center — Associations with clinical characteristics and suspicions of drug-facilitated sexual assault,” Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine 20, 2013, 777-784. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jflm.2013.05.005. (original research)

9) Ian Hindmarch and Rüdiger Brinkmann, “Trends in the Use of Alcohol and Other Drugs in Cases of Sexual Assault,” Human Psychopharmacology 14, 1999, 225-231. DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1099-1077(199906)14:4<225::AID-HUP92>3.0.CO;2-3. (original research)

10) Adam Negrusz and R.E. Gaensslen, “Analytical developments in toxicological investigation of drug-facilitated sexual assault, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry 376, 2003: 1192–1197. DOI: 10.1007/s00216-003-1896-z. (original research)

11) Adam Negrusz, Estimate of the Incidence of Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault in the U.S. Document No.: 212000. National Institutes of Justice, November 2005. (original research)

12) Németh, Z., Kun, B., & Demetrovics, Z. The involvement of gamma-hydroxybutyrate in reported sexual assaults: a systematic review. Journal of Psychopharmacology 24: 9, 2010, 1281-1287. doi:10.1177/0269881110363315. (review and comment)

13) Paul Quigley, Dana Lynch, et al. Prospective Study of 101 Patients with Suspected Drink Spiking. Emergency Medicine Australasia, 21, 2009, 222-228. DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-6723.2009.01185.x (original research)

14) Hywel Hughes, Rachael Peters, Gareth Davies, Keith Griffiths. A study of patients presenting to an emergency department having had a ‘spiked drink.’Emergency Medicine Journal 24:2, 2007, 89-91.  doi:10.1136/emj.2006.040360 (original research)

15) Caryl M. Beynon, Clare McVeigh, Jim McVeigh, Conan Leavey and Mark A. Bellis. The Involvement of Drugs and Alcohol in Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault: A Systematic Review of the Evidence. Trauma, Violence, & Abuse 9: 3, July 2009, 178-88. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1524838008320221 (review and comment)

16) S L Greene, C M Shiew, et al. What’s being usedto spike your drink? Alleged spiked drink cases in inner city London. Postgraduate Medical Journal 83: 986, 2007, 754-758. doi:10.1136/pgmj.2007.059048 (original research)

 

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